Norwegian study reveals new mechanism in Parkinson’s Disease

A new Norwegian study shows new mechanisms behind Parkinson’s disease, which can be key mechanisms for future treatment. The study, conducted by the University of Bergen (UiB), suggestsclose up potrait of smiling Asian senior couple on bright green that the secret of the disease may lie in the mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell. “We hope that our findings may be the key to a future treatment. There is generally very little knowledge about the mechanisms causing Parkinson’s disease. Now, we are a step closer to understanding these mechanisms and we may have a target to strike at for therapy” says neurologist Dr. Charalampos Tzoulis who directed the study at UiB’s Department of Clinical Medicine and Haukeland University Hospital.

“We hope that our findings may be the key to a future treatment. There is generally very little knowledge about the mechanisms causing Parkinson’s disease. Now, we are a step closer to understanding these mechanisms and we may have a target to strike at for therapy”

 Neurologist Dr. Charalampos Tzoulis,  Director of the study at UiB’s Department of Clinical Medicine and Haukeland University Hospital.

The results were recently published in the journal Nature Communications and summarized in Science Daily.  In their study, Tzoulis’ team compared brain cells from healthy aged persons to those of individuals with Parkinson’s disease. The study noted that the brain cells of healthy persons are able to compensate for the age-induced damage by producing more DNA in their mitochondria. This protective mechanism is weakened in individuals with Parkinson’s disease leading to a loss of the mitochondria’s healthy DNA population.

 

Source: University of Bergen. “Getting closer to an effective treatment for Parkinson’s.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 January 2017. You can read more about the study here.